Fall 2012

Death

Introduction: Death

The Fall, 2012 issue of Communio is dedicated to the theme of “Death.” In his book Eschatology, Joseph Ratzinger points out a “remarkably contradictory” attitude toward death prevalent in modern society: “On the one hand,” he writes, “death is placed under a taboo. It is unseemly. So far as possible, it must be hidden away, the thought of it repressed. . . . On the other hand, one is also aware of a tendency to put death on show, which corresponds to the general pulling down of shame barriers everywhere.” . . .

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You Only Die Once: Why Brain Death is Not the Death of a Human Being; A Reply to Nicholas Tonti-Filippini

D. Alan Shewmon

"[The] accusation that I am in conflict with Church teaching about death relies . . . not only on a mischaracterization of my position, but also on a mischaracterization of Church teaching itself. In point of fact, the Magisterium does not formally oblige us to hold that the brain is the master organ of somatic integration, or that its death is therefore the death of the human being as such. Nor does the hylemorphism espoused by Boethius, Aquinas, and the Council of Vienne entail any such claim."

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Singulariter in spe constituisti me: On the Christian Attitude Towards Death

Adrian J. Walker

“The Risen Lord has victoriously filled death with the only substance and intelligibility it can have: himself.”

The Body and Christian Burial: The Question of Cremation

Patricia Snow

“There is a mysterious but real continuity between the body that dies and the body that is raised.”

The End of History: The Parousia of Christ as Cosmic Liturgy

Luis Granados

“On the way to the Parousia, the action of Jesus Christ expands to the whole living body of the Church and, through his action, to the body of the world.”